Posted in writing

Mechanical Cacophony

In a world where people turned to robots to carry out battles, it wasn’t long before the AI within the robots developed feelings themselves.

It started out in a fairly humble manner.  Well, as humble as two hunks of metal tearing into each other would be.  Originally, the robots were controlled by humans.  When makers started to develop partial AI control for their bots, they started seeing improvements in the overall precision they could carry out.  The next obvious step would be to allow artificial intelligence to fully take control of these machines.

Those who could develop the technology first were ahead of the game.  However, others caught up fast.  Necessity is the mother of invention after all.  Some would say survival is something necessary.  Eventually, fights evolved into contests based on how well programmed one’s AI was.

We taught robots to fight.  We taught them to hate, to desire destruction and violence. The more vicious, the more likely it would not hold back against other machines. Somewhere in the mess of it all, it seemed as if the AIs also developed feelings.  Not literal happy-sad feelings like that, but rather the ability to sense pain.  Nobody knew how it happened, as a robot has no central nervous system, and barely what you could call a brain. Nevertheless, when a bot took damage, it would react as if it had been physically hurt.

Before that time, they had no way of communicating verbally.  The introduction of speakers into the bots lead to a predictable outcome: screaming.  Metallic screams of agony each time some saw blade or hammered strike made contact with their shell. No words of any sort could be coaxed out, either.  It was if they were inconsolable.

When the artificial howls of misery finally ceased, we considered all of our options.  The final consensus was that it would be a good idea to retire out bots, and just return to fighting the ways we had always done it, allowing real people to hurt each other.  Robot screams are just too weird after all.

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